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snacks bad for teethCoffee might be a pick-me-up, but it’s a smile put-down

What’s bad for your teeth? Visions of candy and cola might leap to mind, and those are definitely wise to avoid. But they’re not the only snacks that end up having a negative impact on your smile. Get familiar with some of the other foods that tend to stain, damage, erode, or otherwise negatively impact your teeth to stay smiling and stay healthy.

The small steps you take on a daily basis build up to your overall oral health and a beautiful grin. Eat healthier today, and your teeth (and body) will see big benefits down the line.

 Skip Dangerous Snacks to Protect Your Smile

  • Dark beverages (and sauces) – Drinks like coffee, Coke, red wine, black tea, can prove to be staining culprits for your teeth. If you tend to sip on these throughout the day, make sure you alternate with water to help cleanse your teeth. Your enamel is porous, and dark compounds from these drinks can become lodged in your teeth. While brushing and routine cleanings can help whiten your enamel, frequent and long-term consumption of these drinks might result in permanent staining. Coffee and soda are double-edged swords, as they’re also highly acidic and trigger enamel erosion.
  • Overly fragrant foods – If you’re considering a sandwich with raw onions or raw garlic, it might be a good idea to leave it on the shelf. These aren’t going to harm your teeth, but they can linger on your breath all day, bothering coworkers and making you feel self-conscious.
  • Seeds – Seeded breads and berries can be dangerous for your teeth, as the seeds get stuck between them and can remain lodged in place for long periods of time. This can also crack dental work and cause inflammation.
  • Chips and other starchy snacks – Chips are easy to grab on the go, but they’re not the best choice for your teeth (or your whole body). Starchy foods give rise to oral acids and trigger enamel erosion. Potato chips also tend to stick to your teeth and become difficult to remove.
Dalton General Dentist | General Dentist Dalton | General Dentistry Dalton
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